Nobody Takes Responsibility for What Happened to the Iraqi Army

PACE: MISTAKES WERE MADE AT BEGINNING OF IRAQ WAR: If he knew then what he knows now, he might have made some different decisions before the start of the Iraq war in 2003, the outgoing chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff told reporters Friday.”One of the mistakes I made in my assumptions going in was that the Iraqi people and the Iraqi Army would welcome liberation, that the Iraqi Army, given the opportunity, would stand together for the Iraqi people and be available to them to help serve the new nation,” Gen. Peter Pace said. But “they disintegrated in the face of the coalition’s first several weeks of combat, so they weren’t here,” Pace said. Via: LBN E-Lert Link

General Pace seems to blame the Iraqis for the failures of the Iraqi Army. Paul Bremmer wrote a Letter to the Editor at the New York Times including the names of many people who were involved in the disbanding of the army. The film below shows how Paul Bremmer carries much of the responsibility for the dismantling of the Iraqi Army contrary to his claims.

How I Didn’t Dismantle Iraq’s Army

By L. PAUL BREMER III

Published: September 6, 2007

We were right to build a new Iraqi Army. Despite all the difficulties encountered, Iraq’s new professional soldiers are the country’s most effective security force. More

Charles Ferguson, a filmmaker, presents a rebuttal to claims made by L. Paul Bremer III that top American officials approved the decision to disband the Iraqi army.

WATCH THE FILM.

Via: The New York Times

1.2 Million Iraqi Civilian Deaths

Via: latimes.com

By: Tina Susman

According to the ORB poll, a survey of 1,461 adults suggested that the total number slain during more than four years of war was more than 1.2 million.

ORB said it drew its conclusion from responses to the question about those living under one roof: “How many members of your household, if any, have died as a result of the conflict in Iraq since 2003?”

There was no way to verify the number, because the government does not provide a full count of civilian deaths. Neither does the U.S. military.

ORB said its poll had a margin of error of 2.4%. According to its findings, nearly one in two households in Baghdad had lost at least one member to war- related violence, and 22% of households nationwide had suffered at least one death. It said 48% of the victims were shot to death and 20% died as a result of car bombs, with other explosions and military bombardments blamed for most of the other fatalities.

For documented deaths, see Iraq Body Count.

Bush Pal Gets Kurdish Oil Deal

via: The Newshoggers
by Cernig

So a company that is headed by someone who was certainly a member of Cheney’s infamous energy task-force, sits on the boards of Halliburton and Dubya’s library and is on Dubya’s team of foreign advisors gets the very first oil contract out of Kurdistan after they pass a law which makes privatized foreign ownership of Iraq’s oil easier.

Tell me again that it wasn’t at least partly about oil.

This is an interesting post about the benefits of being a friend of Bush’s and Cheney’s, AND in the oil business too!