Olbermann on Bill Moyers Journal Friday Night

Via: Truthout

PBS Airtime: Friday, December 14, 2007, at 9 p.m. EDT on PBS
(check local listings)

Bill Moyers talks about media and the events of the week with MSNBC’s popular and provocative Keith Olbermann.

What’s on Keith Olbermann’s mind about the media? This week, as Rupert Murdoch takes over The Wall Street Journal and as the FCC is about to allow more newspapers to expand into the broadcast business, Bill Moyers Journal continues its reporting on media consolidation and gets insight from MSNBC’s popular and provocative Keith Olbermann. The broadcast includes a report on the debate around relaxing ownership rules and looks at the real-world implications of increasing cross-ownership of newspapers and broadcast outlets in the same markets. Also on the program, Dr. Ron Walters, director of the African American Leadership Center at the University of Maryland, on how race is playing out in the campaign.

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6 thoughts on “Olbermann on Bill Moyers Journal Friday Night

  1. Woo-hoo! Yay, Keith! Too bad Wayne and I will be out Friday night. We’re going to the local Dem’s holiday/victory celebration party, and our rep is supposed to attend. Hopefully, it’ll be rebroadcast so we can catch it.

  2. Also on the program, Dr. Ron Walters, director of the African American Leadership Center at the University of Maryland, on how race is playing out in the campaign.

    It shouldn’t be a factor at all. Humans are humans, regardless of the color of their skin. To encourage people to think of race as any kind of significant factor is to encourage us to divide ourselves along meaningless lines. We don’t need to be dividing ourselves, we need to be uniting, instead. Barack Obama’s racial heritage is of absolutely no consequence, and shouldn’t matter to any of us. He should be judged by the exact same criteria that every other candidate is. Does it matter how “black” he is? No, no more than it matters how “white” John Edwards is. People are still people, and no one, black or white, should be bringing anyone’s race into the picture.

    I have never felt comfortable with the idea of people thinking that only someone who looks like them could represent their views. To think this is to think that no white person could ever represent a black constituent in Congress. This is nonsense. People are people. Just because I happen to be white (through no fault or planning of my own), it does not mean that I couldn’t represent people in my district who are not white. I couldn’t care less what their skin color is because to me, all humans are the same.

  3. Cool. Sometimes I wish I had teevee. -Z

    I have a teevee. It, darkly, is just there, wont sit, beg, rollover or bark at the mailman. Pretty useless, even more so when turned on. I was thinking about removing the tube and inserting an aquarium, or maybe some plastic plants. =)

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