From across the pond – Palin and more..

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What am I to say. I was absolutely flabbergasted by McCain’s choice. My thoughts meandered from “Maybe he’s a genius and I didn’t notice.” to “He’s making fun of all of us.” back to “They won’t vote for someone like her, will they?”. The thought of Sarah Palin jumping into the fray if anything should happen to the oldest first term US-President ever is so outlandish I am really at a loss what to say. It is telling, however, that the Republican leaning part of Larry King’s panel yesterday did not seem too happy, either. They went out of their way to avoid the focus on McCain’s age and the possibility that Sarah Palin could be US President in a hurry.

As usual I give you the quotes of some of the British and European newspapers, so you can get an impression what the “old world” thinks about your politics. Today’s Sunday papers have more than the usual number of really good articles, so enjoy reading.

Murdoch’s The Times points out, that all’s not well within the Republican Party about this:

The Republican presidential candidate, John McCain, was facing a backlash from his party last night over the appointment of Sarah Palin, the governor of Alaska, as his running mate after it emerged that he had met her only once before offering her the job.

His choice of Palin, a 44-year-old, gun-toting, moose-burger-eating mother-of-five, confirmed his maverick reputation but also caused some leading Republicans to question his judgment. (read more)

What a contrast to Obama.  Simon Jenkins explains why the Presidential Elections in the US are so closely watched all over the world and how Obama would put an end to stupidity in US government. Mind, this is still The Times:

Every American voter casts a de facto proxy vote for the disenfranchised millions who consume America’s foreign and military policy abroad, from Iraq, Afghanistan, Sudan and Burma to benighted Palestine. For tens of thousands of them, an American president is the difference between life and death. Millions more depend on the presidential election as beneficiaries of US aid, or as victims of US hostility and sanctions. Billions of Iranians, Pakistanis, Russians and Chinese have an interest as nations which American governments criticise and threaten. Obama’s global popularity lead over McCain is thus more than a beauty contest. Were he to be elected, his country would unquestionably experience an immediate and dramatic surge in popularity. (read more)

The Guardian focusses on the female vote:

Never before have women voters been so much the focus of concerted political attention. Clinton’s sprawling, dramatic battle with Obama has put the female vote firmly in the headlines. By the end of the fight, Clinton had moulded herself into the unabashed champion of women, demanding that their voice be heard. Now Obama is scrambling to make sure those voters stay in his coalition. The surprise factor is that the Republicans have joined the chase and are aggressively pursuing the same target. McCain is heaping praise on Clinton and her achievements. Now he has picked a mother of five from Alaska as his running mate. Battle has been joined. The war for the women’s vote could define the final two months of the election. (read more)

The campaign, will be a vicious one, however, they predict and point out who and what to watch out for:

Democrats do launch attack ads and campaign negatively but no one does it like the Republican party. Under a succession of dark geniuses, the party has perfected the black art of negative campaigning. It has created the most effective attack machine in the Western world, with the sole purpose of destroying opponents and winning elections. For opponents it is a source of shock, misery and more than a little envy. Its tentacles stretch from the McCain campaign into the murky corners of talk radio, the internet and shadowy groups willing to use any outlandish smear. (read more)

The Independent compares the Presidential race to a horse race and warns that all is not over yet:

The thrill of politics, at its simplest, is that of the horse race. In this country, most of us have forgotten what a close race looks like. Our last truly competitive general election was in 1992. Last summer, until Gordon Brown shied at the fence, we were briefly returned to the urgency and the drama of the daily battle for advantage. But America has provided two consecutive two-horse races since the primaries began at the start of the year. This is politics at its most compelling, when the winner is the one who makes the fewest mistakes. (read more)

John Rentoul takes on Sarah Palin, too and has something to say about her as America’s “Iron Lady”.

The Telegraph points to the cloak and daggers-style process around Sarah Palins nomination:

Later that night she held talks with top McCain aides Steve Schmidt and Mark Salter in a “safe house” – the home of a friend of the Republican candidate.

The next morning, Mrs Palin was driven to the McCain ranch in nearby Sedona. There she first met Mrs McCain before her husband formally offered the vice-presidential slot as they sat and chatted on the deck. It was just their second meeting in person.

Mrs Palin and her aide flew later on Thursday with the two McCain lieutenants to Ohio, where they checked in to a hotel as the “Upton family”, while Mr McCain made his way publicly to the key battleground state. (read more)

The risk in choosing Sarah Palin as a running mate goes beyond her inexperience, there’s always “Troopergate”:

What started as a family dispute in the suburbs of Anchorage could yet determine who governs the world’s most powerful nation for the next four years as Alaskan politics finds itself as the unprecedented focus of a billion-dollar election battle. (read more)

The Economist points out the risks of this nomination as well and, again, praises Obama:

But the risks of choosing such an unknown quantity are enormous. An important aspect in selecting a vice-president is to reassure the electorate that should anything happen to the man in the Oval Office there is a competent and trustworthy stand-in ready to take over. John McCain’s age (he is 72) is an underlying factor with voters. Although Ms Palin’s youthfulness, she is 44, is an eye-catching contrast to the top of the ticket, questions will be raised about her ability to run the country if Mr McCain should ever be incapacitated.

And the tenures of both Al Gore and Dick Cheney as vice-president have raised the profile of the office. Vice-presidents were once expected to be solid and reliable but mostly boring. Messrs Gore and Cheney took on policy portfolios, such as government reform or preparing for war with Iraq. Barack Obama’s pick of Joe Biden for the role now seems all the more wise. (read more)

Der Spiegel revisits the race issue:

Now, though, it’s McCain against Obama, Republican against Democrat, old against young — and, more than anything else, white against black. McCain, of course, hasn’t broached the race issue directly. But indirectly, the argument goes like this: To be white means to be like John McCain — patriotic, bedecked with medals and honors, self-sacrificing and a hero. To be black means to be like Barack Obama — eager for the spotlight, similar to a Hollywood actor, egocentric, flippant and lacking truly American values. White America is — subtly and adroitly — being mobilized against black America. (read more)

But Obama has left his mark on the Democratic Party, too, a good thing in Der Spiegel‘s eyes:

One test of a presidential candidate’s strength, and often his best shot at winning, is how much he can mold his party in his image and rally it around a powerful argument for his election. Barack Obama left Denver having made significant progress on both fronts.

The Democratic Party today is different from the one that lost the last two presidential elections. It is bigger, younger and less visibly linked to traditional Democratic interest groups. (read more)

Finally, Die Welt another conservative newspaper puts it’s finger on McCain’s age

Vice presidential choices seldom have much effect on the presidential election. But McCain’s choice received extra scrutiny because of his age and bouts with skin cancer. He turned 72 on Friday and would be the oldest, first-term president in U.S. history. If he dies or is incapacitated in office, Palin would succeed him – a point stressed by Obama’s campaign in pointing to her resume. She is only two years into her first term in governor, and her previous experience was as a small town mayor.

and worries:

Palin has no international affairs experience and, in little more than a month, will be in a nationally televised debate with Biden, one of his party’s leading voices on foreign policy and a quick witted, sharp-tongued public speaker. She is three years younger than Obama and a generation younger than Biden. (read more)

It’s a good thing today is a Sunday, this is an awful lot to read and each one of the sites linked to has much more to offer. So, grab a cup of coffee and see for yourselves. Have a nice and peaceful Sunday!

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10 thoughts on “From across the pond – Palin and more..

  1. Troopergate was just one of her abuses of power. Check this out.

    As mayor of Wasilla, she pulled the ultimate George Bush:

    Wasilla Mayor Sarah Palin fired the city’s police chief and the library director without warning Thursday, accusing them of not fully supporting her efforts to govern. Irl Stambaugh and Mary Ellen Emmons said letters signed by Palin were dropped on their desks Thursday afternoon telling them their jobs were over as of Feb. 13 and that they no longer needed to report to work.

    As a result, she was almost recalled as mayor of a town of less than 6000 people.

    http://hatthief.blogspot.com/2008/08/vetting-sarah-palin-irl-stambaugh-walt.html

    Everyday, I read more and more about this Veep pick, and every day I get angrier and angrier.

    Note to McCain: Take US seriously! You are running for President of the United States of America, not some association at one of the condos you own.

  2. BTW, my last comment was to a blog with fantastic commentary. He has links to the original sources, there. There are several original sources.

  3. once again, EV, thanks for the roundup.

    This bears repeating:

    Every American voter casts a de facto proxy vote for the disenfranchised millions who consume America’s foreign and military policy abroad, from Iraq, Afghanistan, Sudan and Burma to benighted Palestine. For tens of thousands of them, an American president is the difference between life and death. Millions more depend on the presidential election as beneficiaries of US aid, or as victims of US hostility and sanctions. Billions of Iranians, Pakistanis, Russians and Chinese have an interest as nations which American governments criticise and threaten. Obama’s global popularity lead over McCain is thus more than a beauty contest. Were he to be elected, his country would unquestionably experience an immediate and dramatic surge in popularity.

    With McCain’s war-mongering talk, there literally are millions of lives at stake in this election. If we haven’t had a terrorist attack on our soil recently, it’s not because of the efficacy of our national spying aparatus. They couldn’t stop the mass-murder at Virginia State or the mall shootings. They didn’t intercept the plot to assasinate Obama. What they can do is arrest protesters who speak out against the Imperial Presidency.

  4. Fantastic roundup EV!
    Every time I hear Sarah Palin get in front of a camera and talk, I can’t help hearing Sally Fields saying “You like me, you really like me.” when she won her Oscar.

  5. Good roundup, EV.

    Palin will not pull in the women’s vote. She is no Hillary Clinton. If Palin were to go head and head with Clinton, Palin would be put through the shredder.

  6. I saw the video where Cindy McCain explains that Palin has foreign experience because, after all, Alaska is the closest State to Russia. Hum… one bimbo praising another bimbo.

  7. I saw part of it Cats. Apparently the Middle East is no longer a problem. According to Fox News and Cindy the cold war is back and Russia is the problem. I guess the terrorist problem is all fixed.

  8. EV, you outdid yourself. This is fantastic.

    You are going to love this one EV. Cindy McCain was on TV today quoting Fox News about Palin having Foreign Policy experience because Alaska was so close to Russia.

    What Cindy McCain knows about Foreign Policy could fit on the head of a needle. LOL

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