Watering Hole: Monday, May 30, 2011 – Memorial Day

We are a warring nation.  Some served in our military voluntarily while others were drafted.  Regardless as to why someone served, today is a day to remember those that served and lost their lives.

A list of wars:

  • American War of Independence – 1775 to 1783
  • Northwest Indian War or Little Turtle’s War or Miami’s Campaign – 1785-1795
  • Franco-American Half War – 1798-1800
  • Barbary Coast War or Tripolitan War – 1801-1805
  • War of 1812 or Second War of Independence – 1812-1815
  • Second Barbary War or Algerian War – 1815
  • First Seminole War – 1817-1818
  • Arikara War – 1823
  • Winnebago War orLe Fèvre Indian War – 1827
  • Black Hawk War or Black Hawk Campaign – 1832
  • First Sumatran Expedition – February 6 – 9, 1832
  • Second Seminole War or Florida War – 1835 – 1842
  • Texas War of Independence – 1836
  • Mexican War or U.S.–Mexican War – April 25, 1846 – February 2, 1848
  • etc…

There are 61 more wars to add to this list.  You can view the rest here.

Let us not forget the “TV” war – Vietnam.  If George W. Bush actually fought in Vietnam, he would not have been so eager to invade Iraq.  Approximately 58,220 American soldiers lost their lives in Vietnam.  This doesn’t include the millions of Vietnamese that were killed.  War is not the answer.  After all, what is war good for?

This is our Open Thread – Speak Up!  Our freedom demands it.

Sunday Roast: Pyramids Found?

BBC News

More than 1,000 tombs and 3,000 ancient settlements were also revealed by looking at infra-red images which show up underground buildings.

Initial excavations have already confirmed some of the findings, including two suspected pyramids.

Science is so cool.  Why would anyone reject it?  They put satellites in space above the Earth, and by using infra-red imaging, they found evidence of an entire city that was no longer visible to us — including at least two pyramids!

How does that work anyway?

Ancient Egyptians built their houses and structures out of mud brick, which is much denser than the soil that surrounds it, so the shapes of houses, temples and tombs can be seen.

Just imagine the possibilities for future archaeological projects, or examining a site before a road or building is built on it.  I wonder if they can  help me find my keys…?

[Dr Parcak] also hopes the new technology will help engage young people in science and will be a major help for archaeologists around the world.

“It allows us to be more focused and selective in the work we do. Faced with a massive site, you don’t know where to start.

Like I said, science is cool.  If you don’t think so, I think you need your head examined…with science.

UPDATE:
Here’s a radar image of the Sahara, showing the riverbeds under the sand:

For more radar imagery, go here.

This is our daily open thread — Feel free to discuss this, or any other topic!