The Watering Hole, Saturday, March 15th, 2014: Strange Views

I had never heard of the Wellcome Image Awards before, but when I saw “Stunning Science Pictures”, I had to check them out. According to the accompanying article,

“The 13th Wellcome Image Awards took place on March 11, 2014, and recognized some truly remarkable feats in scientific image creation. The contest honors “the creators of the most informative, striking and technically excellent images” that have been recently added to the Wellcome Images collection. Wellcome Images are part of UK-based charitable foundation the Wellcome Trust, who are dedicated to achieving improvements in human and animal health.”

Some of the images really are “Stunning”; others range from (what I would call) ‘delightful,’ to ‘disturbing,’ to ‘gross,’ to ‘frightening.’ Here’s a sampling of the 19 images:

Astrantia Flowers (image credit: Wellcome Collection/Dr. Henry Oakley)

Astrantia Flowers (image credit: Wellcome Collection/Dr. Henry Oakley)

I like the description of the image above: “Photograph of flowers from the plant Astrantia major. This particular variety is called Hadspen Blood, and is also known as Masterwort, Gentleman’s Melancholy [my personal favorite], Hattie’s Pincushion, Mountain Sanicle or Black-root Sanicle.” [emphasis mine]

"Wiring of the human brain:  Bird's-eye view of nerve fibers in a normal, healthy adult human brain."  (Image credit:  Wellcome Collection/Zeynap M Saygin)

“Wiring of the human brain: Bird’s-eye view of nerve fibers in a normal, healthy adult human brain.” (Image credit: Wellcome Collection/Zeynap M Saygin)


"Miniature marine organism:  Light micrograph of a miniature organism found in the sea, part of a group called Foraminifera." (image credit: Wellcome Collection/Spike Walker)

“Miniature marine organism: Light micrograph of a miniature organism found in the sea, part of a group called Foraminifera.”
(image credit: Wellcome Collection/Spike Walker)


Zebrafish embryo: "A scanning electron micrograph of a four-day-old zebrafish embryo" (image credit::  Wellcome Collection./Anne Cavanagh and David McCarthy

Zebrafish embryo: “A scanning electron micrograph of a four-day-old zebrafish embryo”
(image credit:: Wellcome Collection./Anne Cavanagh and David McCarthy

That is one very surprised-looking zebrafish embryo!

Since you may view them with a different ‘eye,’ judge for yourselves: here’s the complete 19-image slideshow, definitely view them full-screen.

This is our daily open thread–go ahead and talk about, well, anything!

51 thoughts on “The Watering Hole, Saturday, March 15th, 2014: Strange Views

  1. Strange photos indeed…… and speaking of wondrous universal stuff …… one more day to Neil de Grasse Tyson’s Cosmos – part deux!!!

  2. Big news out of Moscow this morning….. 50,000 Russian people protesting Putin’s intervention in Ukraine!! The smaller pro-Putin demo is across town (wearing the same red tracksuits the BBC implies they were given as encouragement🙂 ). These will be many of the 100s of thousands who protested Putin’s return to power after he took a constitutional ‘holiday’ as prime minister with sock-puppet Medvedev as President.

    So now what? I think the invasion of Eastern Ukraine may well be off as of today!!

    http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-26593249

    • I remember seeing those images, but I think they were shown on Fox. That doesn’t mean they didn’t get the photos and headlines from the AP, of course.

      • I remember those, and similar ones, as well, though I couldn’t say where I saw them. In one case, a white couple was described as “foraging”.

      • This was noticed and written about at the time. I just never saw it because there were a couple of days there when we just couldn’t watch because it was too overwhelming.

        But in an article on Salon about these pictures…

        http://www.salon.com/2005/09/02/photo_controversy/

        …they said the photographers only write what they saw on the captions, which are not altered by Yahoo!. The photographer actually saw the young man on the right go into a store and come out with those things., and that’s it was accurately as looting. But the couple on the left were not witnessed by the photographer taking the stuff, even though it’s apparent it was looted, as no stores were open to sell it to them.

  3. Just booked flights to Washington D.C. for April 16 – 23! A new place for us and we are pretty excited. Might be late for the cherry blossoms but perhaps we can go on the White House Easter egg hunt! (probably not) Now to find a hotel. I am dying to go to the Air and Space Museum among other things.

    • I don’t know, as hard as this winter is hanging on we might still have blossoms then. I’m about 45 miles SW of DC.

      • Yeah, the ;last few years it’s been so warm that by the time April 15 rolls around (the usual “peak” blossom day), the cherry blossoms have already blossomed and gone. But OIMF’s right. With all the cold weather this year, they should not have bloomed and gone by then. Hopefully, they’ll have bloomed at all. DC really does look nice when they’re in bloom.

      • I doubt that a week will be enough! But it is a start. DC might become our next New York and we may end up going a few times.🙂

    • Funny story about that…

      My high school senior class (from Brewster, NY) was the first to get to go on a class trip to Washington, DC, since my father’s senior class. Apparently there was some unpleasantness; I don’t know if my father was actually involved though I doubt he could have afforded to go. (I had to pay $93 for my trip, which was a lot for a kid making $2.75 an hour off the books on a part-time job.) But it was worth it to me because i would get a chance to see the model of the Star Ship USS Enterprise used to film the Star Trek series.

      The second day of the trip was to the Air & Space Museum and I patiently walked through all the exhibits until we got to the room I wanted to see. There was Lindbergh’s Spirit of St. Louis hanging from the ceiling. And there was the lunar module (allegedly) sent to the Moon and back. There was the plane the Wright Brothers flew at Kitty Hawk. But no USS Enterprise.

      Disheartened, I asked a security guard what happened to the Enterprise, and he said, “Oh, they took it down to film the movie.” My heart finished falling to the bottom of the Earth, then. It was the entire reason I put up with my friends’ pranks and attempts to get me to take a picture of them flipping me the bird. And the worst part is that in the movie, they completely renovated the Enterprise, so they didn’t really need to use that model. They would have made a new one.

      • I have looked at the museum layout online and there is so much there it is already intimidating. Kitty Hawk is the main one I want to see and….

  4. It’s about 60 here, so I headed out to prepare gardens. I lasted about 2 hours and I’m beat. I’m so out of shape from the knee replacement. I am doomed.

    • We reached 54 earlier this afternoon, it’s 51 right now. I noticed when I let a few of the cats out earlier, it actually seemed nice out, despite the thinning layer of snow that still blankets our back yard.

    • Outstanding, don’t try to do so much in one stretch. Park a lawn chair under some shade and take a break every fifteen minutes or so.

      • Good idea, but I don’t need shade yet. I’m damned glad to see and feel some sun.🙂

  5. At a Westside subway excavation, plenty of bones (and more) to pick
    An exploratory shaft dug to assess soil conditions for future stations and tunnels has burped up a bonanza of prehistoric swag.

    Paleontologists have recovered mollusks, asphalt-saturated sand dollars, pieces of driftwood and Monterey cypress cones. For Scott, the most exciting finds have been a rock embedded with what appears to be part of a sea lion’s mouth (perhaps 2 million years old) and a non-fossilized 10-foot limb from a digger pine tree that would look right at home today in Central California woodlands.

    • Welcome to Euromaidan Tweet, Ebb. Tanya’s usually two or three hours faster than them on her FB, but you have to translate the Russian yourself.

  6. The Miserable End Of The Miserable Fred Phelps

    From the Facebook page of Nathan Phelps, who left the family business decades ago, and is now an atheist:

    I’ve learned that my father, Fred Phelps, Sr., pastor of the “God Hates Fags” Westboro Baptist Church, was ex-communicated from the “church” back in August of 2013. He is now on the edge of death at Midland Hospice house in Topeka, Kansas.

    I hope a large part of his bigotry dies with him.

    • I don’t usually speak ill of the ill, but if there’s a hell, get there soon, Fred.

      • I think an ‘impromptu’ gay pride march to coincide with the funeral would be fabulous!

        • They ought to drag his rancid corpse from the coffin and drag it behind a rainbow bedecked float heaving with cross-dressers, Freddie Mercury impersonators and everyone in a George Takei facemask OH MY!!!

    • Unfortunately it seems like his daughter who has mostly run the whole operation in recent years is even more hateful than the old goat himself.

    • If only his family would throw themselves in the grave with him…

      BTW, why was he excommunicated from his own church?

      • I think I’m afraid to know but my guess is that he got feeble and couldn’t keep the level of hate high enough to satisfy his misbegotten brood.

  7. Chris Wallace almost snickered as he introduced Karl Rove as GOP mastermind for the Roundtable. I think he’s starting to chafe at his restraints as host. He sometimes seems to challenge the RWNJs on the show. It’s subtle, but it’s noticeable.

  8. QOTD:
    “Russia is a gas station masquerading as a country,” Sen. John McCain.

  9. FYI to the Zookeepers. Posts all the way back to Friday a week ago have the ‘Featured’ designation at the top. BnF’s Wednesday post is the only one that dropped off the top after it’s day. Puts things out of chronological order on the front page, when that happens.

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