Sunday Roast: 1968

In 1968, my family was living outside of the U.S., in a little place no one has heard of since, namely Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.  I was nine years old and only beginning to become aware of the world outside family, neighborhood, and school.

I was the kind of kid who was outside from morning ’til the street lights came on, so television — especially the news — was way down my list of interesting things to do.  Dad turned on the six o’clock news every night, and I began to realize that the world (the U.S., my world) was burning — literally.

By the time we left Gitmo, I was going on eleven years old, and I knew two things for sure:

  1.  War is bloody and horrible and fucked up, and we need to find a better way to deal with our disagreements.
  2.  People need to be able to stand up for themselves and their rights — civil or otherwise — and speak their minds, without being beaten, fire hosed, or killed.

I was a naive child who thought we’d have these things figured out by the time I had children.  Ha!  Said children are 28 and 33 years old, and just look at what we’ve done to this country…hell, the world.

I am ashamed.

This is our daily open thread.

 

 

4 thoughts on “Sunday Roast: 1968

  1. If you’ve not read it, I highly recommend RFK’s MLK eulogy speech given on this date in 1968. I was lukewarm on Bobby’s Presidential run till that point, at which time — for the first time since his brother’s assassination in 1963 — I finally began to feel that maybe the US did indeed have a future worth looking forward to. That feeling lasted for two months, until Bobby was also assassinated. It’s been downhill ever since.

    Here’s a link to RFK’s MLK memoriam:

    http://www.historyplace.com/speeches/rfk-mlk.htm

    “What we need in the United States is not division; what we need in the United States is not hatred; what we need in the United States is not violence and lawlessness, but is love and wisdom, and compassion toward one another, and a feeling of justice toward those who still suffer within our country, whether they be white or whether they be black.”

    Amen.

Comments are closed.