Mid-Week Gnuzishness

Welcome to Wednesday, Middle of the Weekish Gnuz be forthwith
Sorry if you’re being held on Trumped up charges, but here’s more about the Prezidunce.

Watergate prosecutor reveals bombshell results of Manafort’s lies: ‘Mueller’s got the evidence of conspiracy’
H/T Raw Story
Smoking Gun? Speeding Bullet? Ole Twumpy’s in a world o’ scheiss!

And,
Here are 7 of the most ridiculous and embarrassing moments from Trump’s latest interview revealing he has no idea how to be president
H/T Alternet
Even for TemperTantrumTrump, this is a doozy!

Finally,
Trump rejects ‘man-made’ climate change
H/T The Hill
We’re gonna have a lot of catching up to do once we rid the White House of this vermin.

Open Thread, snitch it up and run with it!

RUCerious @TPZoo

Weekend Gnuz

All the Gnuz that’s fit to display via electrons and stuff.

3 big takeaways from the major new US climate report
Climate change is here, it’s expensive, and it’s deadly, according to a dire new report.

H/T Vox
Republicans and Trumpistas would sacrifice a livable world to make a buck and put it in the piggy bank.
They can’t be trusted with the reins of government.

And,
Warning signs mount for Trump reelection bid
‘They haven’t gotten his job approval over 50 percent, like Reagan,’ says one GOP pollster.

H/T Politico
No more Mr or Ms Nice Person. There’s too much at stake to allow these fascists to continue in power. We need to ensure that sanity prevails in the next election cycle.

Finally,
Pulitzer Prize-winner describes why Trump gets easily played by Putin and Saudi prince: ‘His gullibility is extraordinary’
H/T Alternet
Trump is a devout Mammonist. Money and Greed, Greed and more money, gained illegally or not.

Open Thread, pick it up and throw it over Trump’s imaginary wall!

RUCerious @TPZoo

Daily Gnuz

Tuesday’s Gnuzes for youses.

NYT: Mueller’s questions for Trump focus on Manafort, Flynn, Comey, Sessions
H/T Politico
Fifty questions, any of which Trump will get caught lying about. The game is afoot.

And,

The world’s bleak climate situation, in 3 charts

We’ve got a long way to go and a short time to get there.
H/T Vox
We are going in the wrong direction, fastly

Finally,
Carson’s HUD rent hike is a fix in search of a problem
H/T WaPo
Ben Carson is trying so hard to show that he’s not really ‘black’.
It’s a shame he’s taking it out on the poor. Just Another Trumpa$$hole.

Open Thread, Make light with it!

RUCerious @TPZoo

Daily Gnuz

ROGUE NATION
That is what our country has become.
We are now outside the environmental mainstream that understands and agrees on the science that shows the earth warming due to human intervention that has accelerated since the Industrial Age.

The nations that remain in the Paris Climate Accord should consider imposing a damage control fee. It is estimated that this decision, if not reversed, will add .03 degrees to the environment by the turn of the next century.
An appropriate penalty IMHO, would be a 10% surcharge on all products made in this country that are shipped to any abiding nation.
Those monies would be put to use in mitigation efforts against the damages that will be caused by increased erosion, rising sea levels and the human misery caused by the temperature increase.

In other GNUZ;
The Trump administration’s key lackey posits a dubious claim
Trump economic adviser Cohn says coal can be competitive again: CNBC h/t Raw Story
Wait till those coal miners finally get it. Their industry is dead, the JOBS AREN’T COMING BACK

Trump is probably looking at this as an opportunity to have Barron lead the re-negotiation of the Paris Climate Accord, but…
World leaders warn Trump: ‘Paris agreement cannot be renegotiated’ Sorry Barron, you’ll have to wait till you get out of high school to have your turn at Nepotism kick in.
Assuming, of course, your daddy is still the prezidunce. h/t The Hill

And, finally,
This explains a lot
Trump Got Advice From Fox’s Kimberly Guilfoyle Before Withdrawing From Paris Accord h/t C&L
The Low Information Prezidunce.

RUCerious @ TPZoo

The Watering Hole, Tuesday July 5, 2016 – Environmental News and Food Politics.

Murray Energy Lays Off More Than 1,800 Workers

A coal company wants to blame Obama for a 21% cut in workforce, when in reality it is fracked natural gas that power companies are shifting to.

Obama’s Fault

My grandfather who I never met died when my mother was a child of black lung disease. It is an occupation that I would not wish on anyone. Pollutes the hell out of water when mined and air when burned, and surface mining can obliterate landscapes. Sierra Club has been fighting coal for years. Beyond coal.

Open thread.

The Watering Hole; Friday April 15 2016; Climate Change: Is It Visible?

“Nature is always presenting us with surprises.
And perhaps we are surprised only because we are ignorant.”
(John C. Van Dyke)

I’ve been wondering if/when some signs of climate change and global warming are going to become visible via a quick glance out of my (or most anyone’s) window. In that regard, in fact, I have to wonder if maybe I might have spotted one of those local indicators, and maybe even managed to record it digitally for posterity — last month, March 2016, globally the warmest March since records have been kept.

Below is a series of five photos of the same basic scene (Rocky Mountain Front Range, the series of peaks called the Sierra Mojada, or the Wet Mountains) taken from the same spot (my tee-tiny office’s window). The dates begin in September 2009 and end just last month in March 2016, and each one shows the mountains on the morning after a heavy snowfall. I should note that the four main snow-clad peaks are, l. to r., Greenhorn, North Peak, Mt. St. Charles, and Round Top (clipped, not fully shown). Each peak stands above the timberline and ranges in elevation from 11,750 ft. to 12,350 ft., and all are typically white with snow from late September thru mid-May. Till this year, that is.

The first photo is the ‘oldest’ and shows three of the four peaks noted above, and each of the mountains are snow-clad from summit to base (approx. 7000 ft.). The pair of pines in the foreground stand a block from my window at roughly 6000 ft. and about 7 miles from the base of the mountains. The Mojada are about 5000 ft. tall, i.o.w.

0922-2009 Wet Mtns, 2 frames

▲1. September 2009▲

The second photo mainly focuses on North Peak and Mt. St. Charles (with portions of Greenhorn and Round Top, l. and r., resp.). Note that the pines in the foreground are free of snow but the peaks and the heavily timbered mountain slopes are covered with the white stuff.

Wet Mountains, high noon, 4-19-09

▲2. April 2010▲

Photo number 3 shows the result of a heavy snow from the summits to below 6000 ft, foreground pines included.

▲3. October 2011▲

Photo 4 shows Mt. St. Charles the morning after a heavy snowfall that once again coated the pines at 6000 ft. Note the date.

2015 Feb 26 Mt St Charles 952

▲4. February 2015▲

Finally, the fifth photo shows one of the strangest snowfalls I’ve ever seen. Note that the summits of both North Peak and Mt. St. Charles are far less snow-clad than is typical — lots of bare spots — and the 6000 ft. foreground pines are also clear of snow. The only fresh snow is in the band from the mtn’s base (around 7000 ft) to the cutoff point about halfway up the slope, or around 9500 ft. The date is 13 months beyond number 4 above — March 2016, the “hottest” March since records have been kept.

Mar 19 2016 North peak-St Charles low snowfall 2206r

▲5. March 2016▲

Is that weird snowfall pattern a ‘symptom’ of climate change as seen through my window? I have to wonder how often, historically, mountain snows have made it a point to avoid the summits and instead go for the mid-range elevations elevations only. First time for everything, I suppose, especially on a world in which the most intelligent species consistently performs (and then ignores the consequences thereof) the role of what could easily be viewed as LEAST! intelligent.

I should check with James Inhofe, maybe? Or Trump? Is what I’m seeing happening because of something the Chinese are doing in their effort to sabotage the world economy? Something like that?

If I do hear back from them, I’ll make sure to spread the word. Meanwhile —

“If we but knew our facts, they would point their own conclusions,
and neither theory nor argument would be needed.”
(John C.Van Dyke)

Yeehaw.

******

OPEN THREAD

The Watering Hole; Thursday August 13 2015; ACD and its Predictable Consequences

“We didn’t inherit this world from our ancestors;
we borrowed it from our children.”
~Lakota Proverb

A few days ago I happened across one of the most cogent analyses of the ultimate consequences of Anthropogenic Climate Disruption (ACD) — Climate Change — that I’ve seen to date. It’s written by Chris Hedges, posted on Truthdig.com, and entitled Evoking the Wrath of Nature.

Here is the portion that caught my attention. It is a precise summation of the undercurrent motives behind ACD (seldom if ever stated in the mass media) which drive those national attitudes that have enabled the cause(s) of ACD AND the resistance toward developing solutions before the consequences prove irreversible. On this continent, as Hedges notes, the causal attitudes date back to the arrival of the Europeans, [who were] driven by an avarice that blinded them to all but profit. . . .

The Europeans of the era ridiculed the beliefs of the American Indians, along with their communal structures, in which everything was shared and all had a voice in tribal decisions. They routinely referred to them as “savages” or “heathens.” They painted the militiamen who terrorized and slaughtered Indian communities as military heroes and agents of Christian civilization and progress. They scoffed at legends and beliefs like the one that the remarkable stillness of the lake at the base of Mount Chocorua was sacred to the Great Spirit and should not be violated by the sound of the human voice. The Europeans did not believe that nature could seek vengeance. They were sure they could domesticate and control the wilderness.

Mount Chocorua is named for the great chief Chocorua, one of the last of the Abenakis, who was killed around 1720. He was hounded to the summit of the mountain that now bears his name by white settlers and either shot or pushed off its precipice. He is reputed to have damned the Europeans before he died, saying: “May the Great Spirit curse you when he speaks in the clouds and his words are fire! May lightning blast your crops and wind and fire destroy your homes.”

Chocorua’s grim curse is now reality. Greenhouse gas concentrations, including carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide, continue to rise. Last year was the hottest since we began scientifically tracking weather, and 2015 is expected to top 2014. Glaciers and ice sheets are melting at an accelerated rate, causing the oceans to rise. Even if we stop all carbon emissions today, some scientists say, sea levels will rise by 10 feet by 2065 and as much as 70 feet over the next couple of centuries. Major coastal cities such as Miami and New York will be underwater. Droughts plague huge swaths of the planet. Wildfires, fueled by parched forests, have been burning out of control in Southern California, Canada and Alaska. Monster cyclones and hurricanes, fed by warming air currents, are proliferating, ripping apart whole cities. Massive species extinction is underway. And we could face a planetary societal collapse due to catastrophic food shortages within the next three decades, according to Anglia Ruskin University’s Global Sustainability Institute. Food shortages are being driven by the warming of the planet, an ever-burgeoning population and “widespread shifts in consumption patterns as countries develop”—code for the growing and unsustainable global demand for animal protein as developing countries urbanize and income levels rise.

The blind, self-destructive exploitation that lies at the heart of capitalism, the placing of monetary profit above the maintenance of life, the refusal to understand and accept limits, have turned the victimizers into the victims. Ignoring the warnings of native communities, we have evoked the deadly wrath of nature. And I fear we may not be able to find our way back. (highlight mine)

Greed, combined with the biblical thesis that humans were granted by their God “dominion” over the earth, “dominion” over all of life, are proving to be a deadly combination. Today in this country, with the threat of ACD consequences becoming greater with each passing day, both the (principally right wing) “greed” and “Christian” segments of our society not only work endlessly to deny the scientific reality of ACD, they also leave no stones unturned in their collective efforts to (a) prevent any efforts to reduce carbon emissions, or to (b) rescind the many successful programs already in place — all in the hope of increasing profits and reducing costs, and all of which they do with the nearly full and complete support of the Republican Party. It’s interesting to note, for example, that virtually the entire GOP slate of 2016 presidential candidates — along with the vast bulk of their party’s congressional colleagues — proudly deny even the reality of ACD. “It’s a scientific hoax,” and “climate changes every day,” and “God will not allow . . .” etc. are bogus reasons most often cited as “fact.” The bottom line is that money and profit mean more than anything else on the planet, each and all of its myriad life forms included.

So: Whereto from here? Hedges’s concluding statements seem as fair an analysis of ACD consequences as I’ve yet seen or heard. He writes,

The world does not fit into the rational boxes we construct. It is beyond our control and finally our comprehension. Human beings are not the measure of all things. Existence is a mystery. All life is finite. All life is fragile. The ecosystem on Earth will die. It will be slain by our failure to protect it, or it will succumb to the vast array of natural forces . . . We have lost the capacity for reverence. We slew those who tried to warn us. Now we slay ourselves. (highlight mine)

Indeed, indeed. The haughtiness of unfettered Capitalism has set the stage for its own destruction even as it accepts the destruction of others it has orchestrated over the course of centuries. It seems more the pity that “we” are unable to learn, to follow the course of prosperous survival rather than that of ultimate destruction, of mass extinction. Why might that be? Is the human intellect too dense, too shallow, to comprehend the consequences of its actions?

No. It’s because there is and always has been PROFIT in destruction. And besides, God said . . . etc.

Chief Luther Standing Bear of the Teton Sioux pointed out the clear and obvious countermeasure when he said,

“For the Lakota, mountains, lakes, rivers, springs, valleys, and woods were all finished beauty. Winds, rain, snow, sunshine, day, night, and change of seasons were endlessly fascinating. Birds, insects, and animals filled the world with knowledge that defied the comprehension of man.”

Sounds good, but nope, no way. Ain’t no PROFIT in it.

OPEN THREAD