Happy Birthday, RUCerious!

And many happy returns of the day!

So, what kind of birthday cake would you like?

One with your age on it?

bday cake 21
bday cake 30.jpg

One with fruit on it?

bday cake w raspberries

Or one in the shape of a fruit?

bday cake pineapple

Something simple?

bday cake simple

Or something amazingly elaborate?

bday cake elaborate

I know! How about one with frogs on it?

bday cake frogs

Or maybe not frogs – okay, lessee, R2D2?

bday cake r2d2

Something a tad more dignified?

bday cake wine

Now, I like this one ’cause it comes with matching cupcakes –

bday cake w cupcakes

Okay, I think I found the right one – it has my birthday wish to you on it ~

PEACE, MY FRIEND!

bday cake peace sign

~ OPEN THREAD ~

Sunday Roast: What’s After Dinner?

holiday-cookies

Mmmmmmmmmm, cookies!  Little single servings of sugary heaven.  🙂

Obviously, I didn’t make the cookies shown in the photo, because if I had, I would be forced to hurt whoever had the nerve to eat them.  That just doesn’t go over well with family and friends — so I’ve heard.

If I make cookies, they’re little blobs of dough that get dropped from a spoon, and then bake into gooey deliciousness.  No one is harmed by my ordinary blobby cookies, unless they mind putting on several pounds, or they are diabetic.  I was unkind to my (now former) brother-in-law, who, if he’s still alive, is a diabetic, when I came upon him stuffing cookies into his facial blackhole.  He thought I was joking — I wasn’t.

He deserved it!

Anyhoo, what’s your favorite holiday cookie?  Feel free to share your cookie-related holiday traditions, and how they came about.

This is our daily open thread — COOKIES!!!!!

Sunday Roast: What’s for Dinner?

Weirdly enough, it’s December AGAIN.  Where did this year go?

Anyhoo, this seems to be the time of year when people are interested in cooking a big holiday dinner for the family and friends.  Not me, of course, but some other people.  You know who you are.  🙂

So I thought to myself, “Self, why not do food posts for the month of December?”  And I replied, “Self, that seems like not all that much work…I mean, GREAT IDEA!!  People will love this!!”

Well, ’tis the season of giving, so I give you a lovely ham video.  Personally, I’m glad I’m not scrubbing that pan after dinner.  Yikes.

This is our daily open thread — Post your foodie favs here!

The Watering Hole, Tuesday December 1, 2015 – The Femisphere: Foodies and Food Politics

Profiles of food writing from a feminist perspective from MS Magazine blog.

“Without a doubt, food is an inherently feminist topic. Women are inundated on a daily basis regarding food—whether being told how to properly (and perfectly) prepare it, or how to control our intake of it for “ideal” weight purposes. While there is no shortage of both men and women who write about food online, what sets the following bloggers apart is the feminist lens they use to frame their posts. Some of these bloggers delve into the domesticity angle of food, investigating how years of stereotyped gender norms influence our relationship with food, while others focus on food politics, writing about everything from food accessibility/scarcity to ethical issues. From the delicious and delightful to the problematic and political, all of these blogger tackle food in a uniquely feminist way.”

FemFood: Profiles against the grain.

Sunday Roast: Cranberries!

It’s getting to be cranberry season!!  Everybody cheer!!  Or whine, if necessary.  Go ahead, we’ll wait.  *looking at watch*

I luvs me some cranberries — especially since they’re grown in Oregon.  Throw a handful of dried cranberries in my morning oatmeal, and I won’t get upset.  Hand me a refreshing glass of cranberry juice, cut 50/50 with ice-cold soda water, and I will follow you around the rest of the evening — fair warning.  How about a whole cranberry dipped in chocolate — OMG!!!!

The only cranberry thing I don’t like is that wiggly jiggly can-shaped cranberry “sauce.”  It’s too sweet, and the texture makes my tongue want to slap me, and cry “Why?  How could you do this to me!?”  Then I have to sooth it with a large slice of pumpkin pie, because I’m nice like that.

Okay, enough of my raptures.  What Fall flavors are your favorites, and what are you most looking forward to preparing/eating?  Recipes are welcome!

This is our daily open thread — Mmmmm, cranberries…

The Watering Hole, Tuesday September 29, 2015 – Environmental News and Food Politics

Alarming Report on the Health of Our Oceans

“According to the World Wildlife Fund‘s (WWF) recently released Living Blue Planet Report, marine populations have declined by an astonishing 49 percent between 1970 and 2012, with with some fish species, including tuna, declining by almost 75 percent.”

I think our first Earth Day was in 1970. Our awareness of the earth’s problems has increased dramatically, but our actions to correct them are but a minor blip on the radar.

Pretty alarming numbers. What will the oceans look like in another 40 years?

The Watering Hole, Tuesday June 23, 2015 – Environmental News and Food Politics

“More than 90 percent of the shrimp consumed in the U.S. is imported from overseas, and yet in 2014 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) only inspected 3.7 percent of shrimp imports and tested 0.7 percent.”

Our miniscule shrimp industry feels this way about the Trans Pacific Partnership trade deal: “Members of the U.S. shrimp industry are voicing concerns that elements of a major trade deal, the Trans-Pacific Partnership, could weaken the ability of regulators to reject unsafe seafood imports.”

The rest of the story here.

The Watering Hole, Tuesday June 16, 2015 – Environmental News and Food Politics

I was under the impression for a long time that the back-up food supply for the world was about 30 days. This writer claims that the statement is effective propaganda from the food industry (but he doesn’t state what it actually is). The theme of the article (link below) is that building local food supply can overcome the food industry’s constant chant that the world needs them or we’ll all starve.

Before WWII, the country ate virtually all organic food (because pesticides and chemical additives were basically formulated as part of the war effort.), yet the food industry today claims that organic is a niche market for the well off, but no solution to our current situation. However, we fed 132 million people in 1939 organic food. So, does the guy have an argument?

Organic and local for all?

The Watering Hole, Saturday, June 13th, 2015: Birthday Breakfast

birthday pancakes 2

For Wayne’s 55th birthday, we’re having breakfast. Breakfast is a meal that I could eat any time of day, but today we’re actually having breakfast at normal people’s breakfast time. Wayne’s going to get it to go at Karen’s Diner, a local breakfast-and-lunch-only eatery that’s been in Pawling for as long as I can remember (and we’ve now lived in Pawling for 27+ years) They cook your meal fresh to order – nothing too frilly, just good old breakfast.

mmmbreakfast

After that I think we’ll both need a nap. In the afternoon we’ll watch the Mets game, then the birthday cake will probably precipitate another nap. A nice, lazy Saturday for Wayne’s birthday.

~~~~ HAPPY BIRTHDAY, HONEY! ~~~~

This is our daily Open Thread – have a fun day!

The Watering Hole, Tuesday April 14, 2015 – Environmental News and Food Politics

Today environmental news  and food politics cross paths, in the UK anyway.

Warmer Waters Threaten Future of Traditional Fish and Chips

I can just see the proposals now for a pipeline connecting the Great Lakes with California after seeing this bit: Record low snowpacks in Southwest is bad news for water supplies

And the last bit of good news…

Mercury levels in Arctic birds found increasing over the past 130 years

Open thread, discuss.

The Watering Hole, Tuesday March 31, 2015 – Environmental News and Food Politics

Back after last week’s unexcused absence.

 

Item 1

OK, let’s blame the cookie but not the gun…

Guns don’t kill, cookies do.

Item 2

Don’t know if it is true, but supposedly written on WC Field’s tombstone is the phrase “I’d rather be here than in Philadelphia.” Well, after turning up this story, I’d say he might have been on to something. But not to worry, most of the victims were lawyers.

What do you call 100 lawyers sickened at a banquet? A start.

http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2015/03/nearly-100-people-sickened-after-attending-philadelphia-banquet/#.VRrVwI5vC1w

(With apologies to those among us who toil in the law.)

Little surprises in each morsel.

Open thread.

 

 

 

The Watering Hole, Tuesday March 17 (St. Patty’s Day)

Human antibiotics in meat took another downturn today as club wholesaler Costco is phasing them out of its stores. The story is that Big Agriculture gets the bright idea to doctor the food without studies to determine safety. The FDA goes along because , well, what can be the harm? Only later do we find antibiotic resistance on the rise. As a therapist I knew once said ‘think before you stink’. Can this apply to corporations too?

The antis have it.

Here’s an interesting twist on milk. An Australian researcher claims that milk of most westerners contains a-1 proteins. This a-1 protein was a genetic accident 10,000 years ago in some dairy cattle. Now it is all we drink. The researcher says that a-2 protein is what existed before in these herds, and is what most of the worlds drinks. The research is claiming that a-2 milk is more compatible with the human digestive system. Californians will be the first to tell us whether a-2 is better.

Got a2 milk?

Happy St. Patty’s Day.   Open thread.

The Watering Hole, Tuesday December 2, 2014 Environmental News and Food Politics – A Different Kind of Kickoff

OK, you sports haters are going to love this one. A college president at a Dallas HBCU dropped football and re-purposed the field in to an organic farmstead, where students do work-study. The college is located in a grocery desert (read black ghetto) where residents have little opportunity to shop for fresh food. The president challenged the college’s board to be relevant in the community in which the college resides. Article published by the Mothership of Sports Programming (ESPN). You need to read this.

Radical transformation of a college community.

Open thread.

Michael Sorrell, who scrapped Paul Quinn’s football program seven years ago, stands in a field of greens.

 

Watering Hole: Thursday, November 27, 2014 – The Day for Turkey

For many of us non-vegetarians, today is the big “turkey day” of the year.  Some of us, spend this day with family and friends, some of us spend this day by ourself, and some of us spend this day giving and helping others.

No matter how you spend the day, turkey is often the highlight of the meal.  Even vegetarians enjoy a Tofurky.  Personally, I’m not much of a fan of Tofurky.  To each their own   🙂  .

At our place, when the meal is done, Mr. Nonewhere starts working on the beginnings of turkey soup.  It is cold and damp in the Northwest and in the Northeast of this nation.  I understand that it gets cold and damp in other parts, too (hee, hee).  Nothing warms the inners like soup in the winter and turkey makes a great soup starter.  So to help you with some recipe ideas, here is a link to some yummy turkey soup recipes.

This is our Open Thread.  Speak Up and let us know how your day is going.

The Watering Hole: Tuesday October 14, 2014 – Environmental News and Food Politics

The Global ‘Americanization’ of Diet

I remember many years ago watching television about subjects and events that occurred in foreign countries. When they scanned the places features, particularly cities, the ubiquitous Cocoa Cola stood out in stark contrast to the shop signs in native languages. Coke was, and has been, the leader in exporting poor nutritional content to the outreaching arms of the huddled masses.

U.S. food aid programs soon followed suit with foodstuffs that were processed for long shelf life. Then the food industry got in to the act. Here and abroad, highly processed food has become the norm in country after country. A study by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation found obesity rates and obesity related diseases increased dramatically since 1980.

” The study found that the proportion of overweight and obese people increased in every country in the world between 1980 and 2013, and that nutrition-related diseases, including diabetes and pancreatic cancer, are also increasing.”

The disturbing news? Not one country bucked the trend. Nutrient deficient food is now the norm across the globe.

Open thread – discuss.

 

The Watering Hole, Tuesday September 30, 2014: Environmental News and Food Politics

Study calculates that water on Earth is actually older than our Sun!

The heathens who conduct science in this country strike another blow against the ‘earth is 8000 years old theory. It turns out that the water here on earth may be from interplanetary sources older than our sun (which itself is a bit older than 8000 years old).

Read on…

National monument expanding

Looks like Obama muffed another one. Large portions of Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument increased in size by a factor of six.

Obama’s fault.

 

Born free… again

 

I just knew that this study would come out of Oregon (OSU to be precise)

If Hops aid cognitive function in mice, maybe beer will do it in humans

Pass, pass pass that bottle of beer.

Sunday Roast: Mmmmmmm, Hood strawberries

1370904850_5166_Strawberries

Mmmmmm, Hood strawberries from Sauvie Island.  I bet you wish you had some!!

I wish I had a tiny eraser for that superfluous apostrophe — while I’m eating Hood strawberries for breakfast.  😉

(photo source)

This is our daily open thread — what summer fruits are you eating?

The Watering Hole Tuesday May 6, 2014 – Environmental News and Food Politics – Open Thread

Here is a sad statement about our last unexplored places:

“Most of the deep sea remains unexplored by humans, and these are our first visits to many of these sites, but we were shocked to find that our rubbish has got there before us.” stated one researcher from an international study team.

Trash before we get there.

Staying with our ocean theme, we seem to be slowly but steadily destroying the food chain, starting with the largest organisms first (think whales, tuna, sharks) and now right to the bottom of it, where acidification of the ocean melts the shells of tiny marine snails. Dare to dream of a fishless ocean.

Will fish farming be the only way to obtain seafood in the future?

And now for the good news: Vermont Legislature passes GMO labeling law, and the governor is expected to sign it.

Finally, a state with courageous politicians.

 

The Watering Hole, Tuesday April 1, 2014 – Environmental News and Food Politics

April Fools!!!!!!!

 

Too tired to be clever, so I’ll leave that to others.

1. Time to Vege Up! Cut out the meat and the cheese if you want to save the world.  

“If agricultural emissions are not addressed, nitrous oxide from fields and methane from livestock may double by 2070. This alone would make meeting the climate target essentially impossible.”

2. Last week it was Chernobyl, this week Three Mile Island is celebrating an anniversary. I actually remember this one pretty well. Just met Cats and lived in Reading, PA, about 60 miles downwind of the disaster. Have we learned anything yet?

3. GMO labeling won’t go away. Food Democracy showing signs of resurgence in California, Colorado. Referenda – the people speak.

 

OPEN THREAD!

Tuesday March 18, 2014 Watering Hole – Environmental News and Food Politics – Open Thread

Paris implements a partial ban on driving carsBus riding is free during pollution event. Seems there are too many cars on the road. Can you imagine a ban on cars here in the good old freedom fighting US of A?

Winners and losers. Seems that are too many buckets at the Texas well and farmers are getting turned away. Rain, rain, don’t go away, pretty please.

Cryogenics worksIf you start as moss, you’ll come back as moss.

Divers find 65 foot long crack in Columbia River dam. There’s only one thing to say about this – oh shit!

Baseball season is approaching. Dining during the national pastime: The top ten vegetarian friendly ballparks. Philadelphia may not win the pennant this year, but we’re number 1 in something!

DISCUSS…

Watering Hole: Tuesday, March 11, 2014 – I Remember

I remember when all vegetables were organic and purchased from the local farmer.  As a matter of fact, when I was a very young child, I remember a farmer driving his truck around the city where I lived and selling his produce right off the back of his truck.  Before supermarkets, our food came from the corner grocery store and with the exception of the Birdseye frozen vegetables and canned vegetables (yuk), it was fresh from the local farmer.  If it was out of season, it wasn’t on the shelf. The corner grocery store was often owned by a butcher.  Our little neighborhood supported three corner butcher/groceries.  The meat was not factory farmed and tasted good.  Once a week, the milkman would stop by very early in the morning and drop off farm fresh milk and eggs.  My mother would put money in an envelope along with a note for her next order and leave it in the insulated milk box.

Then the supermarket chains appeared and gradually put an end to the corner butcher/grocery stores.  This was when factory farming became all the rage and the farmers turned to using pesticides and chemical fertilizers.  The ranchers discovered that feeding steers grain made them get fatter faster which meant a quicker and higher return on their investment.  Along with the grain came an increase in intestinal salmonella growth in the cattle and the contamination of the meat supply.  Cattle are NOT grain eaters.  They are grass eaters and salmonella does not grow freely in a grass fed bovine.  Besides, grass fed beef is high in Omega 3’s whereas grain fed beef is high in Omega 6’s.  That’s a story for another time.

Now, we pay premium prices for organic food which was once the only food that could by purchased at the local grocery.  Has Monsanto won or are we waiting for summer’s bounty from the local farmers?  I am anxiously awaiting the return of the local farmers’ markets.  Now if only I can find room in my small house for my freezer.

This is our Open Thread.  Speak Up!