Sunday Roast, February 3, 2013 – Food for Thought

Just some numbers:

Iraq Body Count 2013

341 civilians killed

United States Body Count from gun violence in 2013 (you can use the date range button on the site)

936 civilians killed

Numbers may increase with every click on the link.

We all agree, that Iraq is a postwar society, plagued by ethnic conflicts and a weak government. We all agree that the United States of America is not that. Or do we?

This is an open thread. Comment on this, or on anything else that comes to mind and have a wonderful Sunday everyone.

The Craving (with Apologies to Edgar Allan Poe, Again)

This poem was originally published on 12/24/06. It is being presented here on the eleventh anniversary of the September 11 criminal attacks. It is this author’s very considered opinion that the attacks should have been treated as crimes and not Acts of War. You don’t use the military to go after the Mafia, and we should not have used the full force of our military to go after al Qaeda. In fact, I firmly believe that had we not gone in with our full military, we would have gotten the intel faster and Seal Team Six could have done their job sooner. But that’s a debate for another day.

———-

There has been much speculation about why the President really chose to invade Iraq. Some say it was to stabilize the region so our access to oil would be secure. Some say it was because Saddam had tried to assassinate the president’s father years before. (Then-President Clinton had already punished Saddam for that one, but that’s another story.) I am of the belief that this was just one part of an ambitious effort by President George W. Bush and Vice President Dick Cheney to expand the powers of the Office of the President of the United States of America to a height even Richard M. Nixon would have secretly envied. They are invoking a theory called the “Unitary Executive” which, in essence, says that the Executive Branch of our government has just as much say as to how the laws and the Constitution should be interpreted as the other two branches. (And I don’t mind telling you that it wasn’t easy to work the phrase “Unitary Executive” into a poem structured like this.) This theory has not been widely accepted by constitutional scholars. That little detail, however, has not stopped them. With sincere apologies to Edgar Allan Poe and fans of his great poem “The Raven”, I would like to present my version of the president’s quest for power with a poem I call “The Craving.” And my most deepest thanks to my wife, Jane, for her invaluable assistance in writing this. I hope you enjoy it. And if by some strange fluke of reality, you happen to be reading this Mr. President, take the hint.

The Craving
By Wayne A. Schneider

Act I: Extremists

Once upon a Tuesday Morning, after I ignored a warning
Over many there came a furious full plume of fiery gore.
Later seated simply staring, suddenly someone was sharing
That the enemy was bearing, bearing toward my White House door.
“It’s those terrorists,” I muttered “bearing toward my White House door.”
It was one, and there were four.

The other planes had landed where the terrorists had planned it,
Bringing death and devastation on a scale unseen before.
But the passengers still flying on Flight 93 were trying
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Afghanistan is Lost!

source:www.defense.gov

This is one major scoop of investigative journalism, just right next to The Pentagon Papers.

Wikileaks has produced over 90’000 partly classified documents covering a six year stretch of the Afghan mission. The Guardian in the UK, Der Spiegel in Germany and The New York Times have each received the documents a while ago for review and released their findings today. As I am writing this I cannot reach the wikileaks webpage, which must be overwhelmed with traffic, I suspect, so I give you a gist of what the three news outlets are making of the documents.

Der Spiegel:

The documents offer a window into the war in the Hindu Kush — one which promises to change the way we think about the ongoing violence in Afghanistan. They will also be indispensible for anyone seeking to inform themselves about the war in the future. (read article)

The newspaper then highlights five issues, one of them the situation in the North where German forces are stationed:

The Germans thought that the northern provinces where their soldiers are stationed would be more peaceful compared to other provinces and that the situation would remain that way.

They were wrong. (read more)

In an interview with the weekly Julian Assange, founder of Wikipedia, says:

Assange: These files are the most comprehensive description of a war to be published during the course of a war — in other words, at a time when they still have a chance of doing some good. They cover more than 90,000 different incidents, together with precise geographical locations. They cover the small and the large. A single body of information, they eclipse all that has been previously said about Afghanistan. They will change our perspective on not only the war in Afghanistan, but on all modern wars. (read full interview)

The Guardian obviously eyes the British side of the conflict:

Questionable shootings of civilians by UK troops also figure. The US compilers detail an unusual cluster of four British shootings in Kabul in the space of barely a month, in October/November 2007, culminating in the death of the son of an Afghan general. Of one shooting, they wrote: “Investigation controlled by the British. We are not able to get [sic] complete story.” (read all)

and more here

The US army’s archives contain descriptions of at least 21 separate occasions in which British troops are said to have shot or bombed Afghan civilians, including women and children.

The logs identify at least 26 people killed and another 20 wounded as a result. Some casualties were accidentally caused by air strikes, but many also are said to involve British troops firing on unarmed drivers or motorcyclists who come “too close” to convoys or patrols. Their injuries result from what are described as “warning shots” or “disabling shots” fired into the engine block, as required by the military’s “escalation of force” regulations.

They explain how they came by the data:

The Afghanistan war logs series of reports on the war in Afghanistan published by the Guardian is based on the US military’s internal logs of the conflict between January 2004 and December 2009. The material, largely classified by the US as secret, was obtained by the whistleblower website Wikileaks, which has published the full archive. The Guardian, along with the New York Times and the German weekly Der Spiegel, was given access to the logs before publication to verify their authenticity and assess their significance. (read all and watch video)

The New York Times explains to its readers:

Deciding whether to publish secret information is always difficult, and after weighing the risks and public interest, we sometimes chose not to publish. But there are times when the information is of significant public interest, and this is one of those times. The documents illuminate the extraordinary difficulty of what the United States and its allies have undertaken in a way that other accounts have not. (read more)

The role of Pakistan in the Afghan war is of special interest to the NYT:

Some of the reports describe Pakistani intelligence working alongside Al Qaeda to plan attacks. Experts cautioned that although Pakistan’s militant groups and Al Qaeda work together, directly linking the Pakistani spy agency, the Directorate for Inter-Services Intelligence, or ISI, with Al Qaeda is difficult.

[...]

Such accusations are usually met with angry denials, particularly by the Pakistani military, which insists that the ISI severed its remaining ties to the groups years ago. An ISI spokesman in Islamabad said Sunday that the agency would have no comment until it saw the documents. Pakistan’s ambassador to the United States, Husain Haqqani, said, “The documents circulated by WikiLeaks do not reflect the current on-ground realities.”

[...]

On June 19, 2006, ISI operatives allegedly met with the Taliban leaders in Quetta, the city in southern Pakistan where American and other Western officials have long believed top Taliban leaders have been given refuge by the Pakistani authorities. At the meeting, according to the report, they pressed the Taliban to mount attacks on Maruf, a district of Kandahar that lies along the Pakistani border. (read more)

There is heaps more in all three newspapers and this story is going to be hot for weeks to come, due to the vast expanse of the information made available. This may well be the final nail into the coffin of the Afghanistan war. There already is growing opposition against the mission and seeing the stark truth will further convince people, that the fight is not worth it. The documents cover the time from January 2004 to December 2009 after Iraq has been attacked on March 20th 2003 and the focus shifted away from the Afghan mission. The leaked documents don’t say anything about the time between October 2001 and 2004. I do hold on to the belief, however, that the Afghanistan mission wasn’t doomed from the beginning. But absolutely after the decision was made to attack Iraq. And again, as it is with most conflicts, the people of Afghanistan have suffered before the war, during the war and will continue to suffer after the international troops have long left.

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Ret. intel officer: US violated rules in Reuters shooting

From Raw Replay:

Lt. Col. Tony Shaffer told MSNBC’s Dylan Ratigan that US forces may have violated rules of engagement with the 2007 shooting of two Reuters employees in Baghdad.

I watched this video yesterday on Huffington Post in its entirety. It was very upsetting. The video was obtained by WikiLeaks.

From Huffington Post:

Calling it a case of “collateral murder,” the WikiLeaks Web site today released harrowing video of a U.S. Army Apache helicopter in Baghdad in 2007 repeatedly opening fire on a group of men that included a Reuters photographer and his driver — and then on a van that stopped to rescue one of the wounded men.

In the Ratigan interview with the gentleman from WikiLeaks, Julian Assange, he (Assange) says there is another similar video (a military whistleblower video) from Afghanistan – from May of last year where 97 people were bombed – that is going to be released through Wikileaks as soon as they “have finished their analysis”.

And the killing goes on..

Again, multiple blasts have rocked Baghdad. Latests news claim 127 people have died and 448 men, women and children have been wounded.

The explosions on Tuesday shook houses across the capital.

Official buildings located near the blasts include the interior ministry, the social affairs ministry, a university and the institute of fine arts.

There were civilian and security force personnel casualties, officials said.

Survivor Ahmed Jabbar, emerging from a damaged ministry building, told AP news agency: “What crime have we committed? Children and women were buried under debris.”

If anybody needs a reminder that not all’s well, even if the media have mostly stopped reporting on the violence unless it’s as devastating as the latest attack, here’s icasualties.com.

And I thought Madoff was a thief..

Money on pallets in Iraq

Where did all the money go to?

The Maddoff ponzi scheme is fraud of the first order. Billions have been lost, but there is an even bigger and nastier case of fraud out there. The Independent reports, that some $ 50 billion have been lost in corruption and outright theft in Iraq. And the culprits seem to be US Army officials.

In what could turn out to be the greatest fraud in US history, American authorities have started to investigate the alleged role of senior military officers in the misuse of $125bn (£88bn) in a US -directed effort to reconstruct Iraq after the fall of Saddam Hussein. The exact sum missing may never be clear, but a report by the US Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction (SIGIR) suggests it may exceed $50bn, making it an even bigger theft than Bernard Madoff’s notorious Ponzi scheme. (read story)

Unlike the Madoff crime story, which affected mostly people who could lose millions and still be wealthy, this crime had more vulnerable victims. The Iraqi people who are still not having electricity, clean water, functioning hospitals. And American soldiers, too. There’s the shoddy infrastructure they were faced with and there was the anger among Iraqis that helped fuel the civil war which cost so many soldiers’ lives. A few made a fortune from their blood.

If I knew how, I’d create a BushcrimesWiki (if there isn’t any yet) to keep track of all the misdeeds of your former President’s administration. If the Democrats refuse to look, as Paul Jamiol put so aptly in his cartoon, it’s up to us to create the pressure necessary to get Bush/Cheney tried in a court of law. The buck ultimately stops at their door.

Good riddance to bad rubbish

George W. Bush gave his last press conference today and, as usual, could not restrain himself from his tendency toward long, rambling non-answers to questions and inappropriate smiles and shrugs.

Regarding Katrina, Bush said he’s thought about it a lot.  Then he proceeded to give a sarcastic “what if” scenario about landing Air Force One in New Orleans or Baton Rouge, and the fact that the media would then have gone after him for pulling police protection off “the mission.”  I don’t recall anyone ever actually wanting Bush to personally pull people out of the Superdome or the attics of flooded homes.

He was the most aggressive after being asked a question about the popularity of the US, raising his voice and declaring that he didn’t believe the US was unpopular in the world, and he wasn’t trying to be popular anyway.

What I found most disturbing was his flippant response to the WMD that were never found in Iraq:

“Things didn’t go according to plan, let’s put it that way,” Bush said with a smile, then a grimace. The WMDs touted by Bush and his advisers were never found. More than 4,000 American troops have died as a result of the invasion; the toll for Iraqi civilians is in the tens of thousands.

The shrug after he said that sent chills down my spine.  How could he have such a “who gives a shit” attitude after sending so many to their deaths — when it was entirely preventable?

This has been the longest eight years of my life, and thankfully I and my children have our lives — unlike so many thousands.

The trash goes out on January 20, 2009.  Good riddance.

UPDATE: Bush to give farewell address to the nation on Thursday night.  Thanks for the warning…

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Stunning… Appalling…

Cheney recently made the stunning statement that it didn’t matter if Iraq had WMD, we were going to invade them anyway.  I guess that statement in itself isn’t all that stunning, we in the blogosphere have been saying it for years.  It’s just rather surprising to hear him say it out loud.

This from ThinkProgress:

Today on MSNBC’s Hardball, right-wing commentator Frank Gaffney defended Cheney’s remarks, saying that the “real reason” the Bush administration wanted to invade Iraq was because Saddam was a “mortal threat” to the United States.

Yeah, yeah.  Same shit, different day.  Right?

Wrong.  Listen to this:

You heard that right.

My position is that it’s regrettable that any Americans died. It is regrettable that they had to die, but I believe they did have to die.

Un-fucking-believable.

Avast Ye Privateers

Arrrgh!

When President George W. Bush wanted to get around the Constitution in order to raise and support his own private army to provide protection for Coalition Provisional Authority chief L. Paul Bremer, Blackwater was there. When the president also wanted his own private army to operate on American soil, one of many disastrous moves by his administration during Hurricane Katrina, Blackwater was there. When seventeen Iraqi civilians were gunned down by foreigners in Nisoor Square, Blackwater was there. And now that pirates are ramping up their operations off the coast of Somalia, it looks like Blackwater will be there, too.

According to Blackwater Worldwide CEO and Founder, Erik Prince,
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Blackwater May Face New Legal Problems

Blackwater Worldwide could be fined millions of dollars for shipping weapons to police training facilities in Iraq and Jordan without proper licensing.  Also, a grand jury in Washington is to decide the fate of individual Blackwater guards involved in a shooting incident in Baghdad last year – they could be indicted.

One official said 900 weapons were shipped improperly, though another said the figure is lower. Each weapon shipped could constitute a separate violation and carry a hefty fine. Sources said the foul-up may have been unintentional but left the company unable to properly account for the weapons.

“They didn’t do the original paperwork, therefore they don’t know where the guns are,” said one source. A State Department spokeswoman declined to comment.

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Manufacturing Sympathy: Sarah Palin, Special Needs and Identity Politics

CommonDreams

As the older brother of someone with Down Syndrome, I’ve been intrigued by Republican vice-presidential candidate Sarah Palin’s use of her son Trig during the campaign. It’s strange to listen to her speak so tenderly about the “special love” that special needs children bring into the world on the heels of Republican rallies resembling lynch mobs, often incited by her characteristic vitriol. On Friday, Palin gave her first policy speech, which was-not surprisingly-dedicated to issues confronting special needs families. Watching it live on FOX News, I couldn’t help but wonder if something was wrong with my television as she proceeded to announce how profoundly being the parent of a child with Down Syndrome has touched her life. It was the perfect advertisement for compassionate conservatism. Who could criticize this dedicated mother of a special needs baby?

It’s tough. In her emotional speech, not only did Palin announce that she supports fully funding the Individuals with Disabilities Act, she also stressed that she would fund more school services to meet the demands of special needs students, strengthen the National Institute of Health so that every family has a place to go for support and guidance, and modernize the Vocational Rehabilitation Act so that special needs adults can live independently if they are able and choose to do so. It sounds like the dream of every special needs family.

So what’s the problem?

First of all, if elected, Sarah Palin will report to a powerful boss in the White House who has repeatedly called for a government-spending freeze during what is shaping up to be a long economic crisis. During the last presidential debate, Senator John McCain praised Palin’s dedication to the special needs cause and commended what she has accomplished for the community as governor of Alaska. Senator Barack Obama also applaud Palin for increasing spending to special needs programs, but quickly pointed out that he doesn’t understand how McCain would pay for doing the same thing across the nation if elected President-a contradiction worth exploring further.

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Where Barack Obama stands on 10 key issues

Newsday

In accepting the Democratic Party presidential nomination Barack Obama laid out his philosophy on the role of government.

Newsday examined Obama’s positions
on 10 key issues:

On the economy: Would inject $75 billion into the economy through tax cuts and direct spending, targeting working families, seniors, homeowners and the unemployed. He contends this would prevent 1 million Americans from losing their jobs. The plan includes an immediate $250 tax cut for workers and their families and an immediate, temporary $250 bonus to seniors in their Social Security checks. 

On Iraq/Afghanistan: Pledges to withdraw most U.S. troops from Iraq within 16 months, by the end of next year, four months earlier than his previous pledge. A residual force would remain to conduct targeted counterterrorism missions against al-Qaida, protect American diplomatic and civilian personnel, and support Iraq’s security forces. Opposed use of military force in Iraq, as well as the January 2007 “troop surge,” saying that while it improved security, a political accommodation in the country is the ultimate solution. 

On National Security: Would implement 9/11 Commission recommendations. Would close controversial prison at U.S. naval base at Guantanamo Bay, which holds hundreds of suspected terrorists and other detainees. Voted to reauthorize Patriot Act in 2006, but would revise it. Pledges to secure chemical plants and ensure safe, secure disposal of nuclear waste.

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Friendly fire in Iraq — and a coverup

Salon

The Army says no, but a graphic video and eyewitness testimony indicate that a U.S. tank killed two American soldiers. The mother of one soldier demands answers.  Mark Benjamin from Salon.com obtained evidence that the Army lied to Jean Feggins about her son’s death.

Once a cop, always a cop. Asked if she wanted to see a graphic battle video showing her son Albert bleeding to death, Jean Feggins, retired from the Philadelphia Police Department, said yes.

“Listen, I’ve moved dead bodies of people I don’t even know,” she told me, as she sat on a brown couch in the den of her West Philadelphia row house. “I need to know everything. Because he is not a stranger. That’s my baby. That’s my child.”

When Pfc. Albert Nelson died in Iraq in 2006, the Army first told Feggins that he might have been killed by friendly fire, and then that it was enemy mortars. She says she never believed the Army’s explanation. “I always felt like they were lying to me,” she said. “I could never prove it.”

“I would ask the casualty officer what was going on. I’d be told they are still working on the report,” she said. “They were still doing their investigation. What could I do? It’s the U.S. military. I had no control.”

She did not know that there was a video of his death until I contacted her recently. Salon has obtained evidence – including a graphic, 52-and-a-half minute video – suggesting that friendly fire from an American tank killed two U.S. soldiers in Ramadi, Iraq, in late 2006, and that the Army ignored the video and other persuasive data in order to rule that the deaths were due to enemy action. Feggins watched the video with me in her den.

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U.S. Spending $300M For Propaganda In Iraq

The DOD has decided to drop $300 million to produce news stories and public service advertisements in Iraq to support pro-America messages and themes. The pentagon has awarded three year deals to private U.S. contractors-last week to four companies- which means this could last long after our withdrawal from Iraq.

This will expand and consolidate what the U.S. military calls “information/psychological operations” in Iraq far into the future, even as violence appears to be abating and U.S. troops have begun drawing down.

The military’s role in the war of ideas has been fundamentally transformed in recent years, the result of both the Pentagon’s outsized resources and a counterinsurgency doctrine in which information control is considered key to success. Uniformed communications specialists and contractors are now an integral part of U.S. military operations from Eastern Europe to Afghanistan and beyond.

Iraq, where hundreds of millions of dollars have been spent on such contracts, has been the proving ground for the transformation. “The tools they’re using, the means, the robustness of this activity has just skyrocketed since 2003. In the past, a lot of this stuff was just some guy’s dreams,” said a senior U.S. military official, one of several who discussed the sensitive defense program on the condition of anonymity.

See the Pentagon is trying to compete with the propaganda market dominated by al-Qaeda, as Secretary Gates puts it “We’re being out-communicated by a guy in a cave.” So basically, the government is admitting that anyone with a Web site is doing better than they are at spinning their doctrine. Psst..that might not be a good thing to tell the American people.

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Scathing Review of Palin’s VP Performance

Nielsen: Biden Scores Big On Iraq, Palin’s “White Flag Of Surrender” Tanks

           

If Sarah Palin had kept up with current events here and abroad; she wouldn’t be in such a difficult position trying to play catch up-when it comes to domestic and foreign policy. These large, very obvious gaps in her knowledge are crystal clear, as millions of viewers have seen, in interviews and painfully noticeable at the debate last night. Mike and John at Politico-are not at a loss for words about Palin’s performance at the debate.

She got out alive, though there were white-knuckle moments along the way: questions that were answered with painfully obvious talking points that betrayed scant knowledge of the issue at hand, and sometimes little relevance to the question that had been asked.

But recent days have given John McCain’s team little reason to suppose that not-that-bad is good enough. The Republican ticket’s sliding polls and narrowing electoral map gave it a different imperative in her showdown against Joe Biden. That was to alter the trajectory of the race in a way reminiscent of how Palin first enlivened Republicans-it seems long ago now-when she joined the ticket in late August.

There were so many times throughout the night when she was clearly out of her depth. Palin kept backsliding into the main talking point of drilling Alaska and offshore.

To the contrary, it is hard to count any objective measures by which Biden did not clearly win the encounter. She looked like she was trying to get people to take her seriously. He looked like he was running for vice president. His answers were more responsive to the questions, far more detailed and less rhetorical.

On at least ten occasions, Palin gave answers that were nonspecific, completely generic, pivoted away from the question at hand, or simply ignored it: on global warming, an Iraq exit strategy, Iran and Pakistan, Iranian diplomacy, Israel-Palestine (and a follow-up), the nuclear trigger, interventionism, Cheney’s vice presidency and her own greatest weakness.

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McCain’s Campaign of lies-Palin No Iraq Visit?

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McCain’s straight talk has become a toxic mix of lies and double-speak. It is leaving a permanent stain on his reputation for integrity, and it is a short-term strategy that eventually will backfire with the very types of independent-thinking voters that were so attracted to him.

John McCain released an ad this week making the accusation that Barack Obama supports sex education for five-year-olds. The ad says:

Education Week says Obama ‘hasn’t made a significant mark on education,’ that he’s ‘elusive’ on accountability, a ‘staunch defender of the existing public school monopoly.’

“Obama’s one accomplishment? Legislation to teach ‘comprehensive sex education’ to kindergartners. “Learning about sex before learning to read? Barack Obama. Wrong on education. Wrong for your family.”

The facts are: Obama said that he did not support telling youngsters about explicit information about sex. The bill specifically mentions that instructional material must be age appropriate. It specifically mentions teaching children how to “say no to unwanted sexual advances” and “nonconsensual physical sexual contact.” The legislation was not sponsored by Obama and it didn’t pass, so calling it one of his “accomplishments” is absurd. Politifact.com rates this claim LIAR-Pants on Fire!

Now the next revelation in the ongoing saga of lies from the McCain/Palin campaign to unfold is that, according to a new report, Governor Palin didn’t go to Iraq as the campaign claimed.

Palin made an official visit to see Alaskan troops in Kuwait in July of 2007. There, she made a stop at a border crossing with Iraq, but did not actually visit the country, according to a new report in the Boston Globe.

Earlier, McCain aides had said that Palin visited Iraq, and expressed indignation at questions about her slim foreign travel. The campaign also said she had been to Ireland; that turned out to have been a refueling stop.

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9/11 Plus Seven

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From TomDispatch

The events of the past seven years have yielded a definitive judgment on the strategy that the Bush administration conceived in the wake of 9/11 to wage its so-called Global War on Terror. That strategy has failed, massively and irrevocably. To acknowledge that failure is to confront an urgent national priority: to scrap the Bush approach in favor of a new national security strategy that is realistic and sustainable — a task that, alas, neither of the presidential candidates seems able to recognize or willing to take up.

On September 30, 2001, President Bush received from Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld a memorandum outlining U.S. objectives in the War on Terror. Drafted by Rumsfeld’s chief strategist Douglas Feith, the memo declared expansively: “If the war does not significantly change the world’s political map, the U.S. will not achieve its aim.” That aim, as Feith explained in a subsequent missive to his boss, was to “transform the Middle East and the broader world of Islam generally.”

Rumsfeld and Feith were co-religionists: Along with other senior Bush administration officials, they worshipped in the Church of the Indispensable Nation, a small but intensely devout Washington-based sect formed in the immediate wake of the Cold War. Members of this church shared an exalted appreciation for the efficacy of American power, especially hard power. The strategy of transformation emerged as a direct expression of their faith.

The members of this church were also united by an equally exalted estimation of their own abilities. Lucky the nation to be blessed with such savvy and sophisticated public servants in its hour of need!

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Only the McCain Family Suffers From War

Do you believe this? This is just more of the “POW” type hype put out by the McCain campaign. They want us to believe that no one suffered more in Vietnam than John McCain and no one feels the effect from war more than the McCain family. This is an out and out insult to anyone that has or is currently serving in our military and their families.

Shame on you, John McCain for trivializing war.

And as for Governor Palin’s son Trak, I think this is his first trip to Iraq and he is going to a “cushy” job as a guard in the Green Zone. There will be no roadside bombs anywhere near Trak. Unlike other families with members serving in Iraq, Governor Palin should be able to sleep at night.

Quick Reviews at TheZoo – 07 Sep 08

  • A new language has been discovered.  It is known as Palinguage. and it comes with its own dictionary.  You will enjoy learning this new language.  It has only been recently discovered.  Do feel free to add more words to this language as it is still in the developmental phase.
  • Oh Sarah Palin, did you not think that you would make enemies as you stepped on everyone while climbing to the top?  Lyda Green, Republican State Senate President (AK) had this to say about Governor Palin.
  • “She’s not prepared to be governor. How can she be prepared to be vice president or president?” said Green, a Republican from Palin’s hometown of Wasilla. “Look at what she’s done to this state. What would she do to the nation?”
  • Senator Joe Biden was on Talk of the Nation this past Sunday.  He was asked about the Iraq war and he had this to say. What is happening now in Iraq is exactly what he suggested two years ago… the formation of a confederation of States.  He also said that President Bush is now working on a deal with the Iraqis that would set time lines for the withdrawal of American troops from Iraq, just like Barack Obama’s plan.  Then Joe Biden went on to say that John McCain is the only one that wants to stay in Iraq indefinitely.  So everyone knows that we need to get out of Iraq except John McCain and Sarah Palin.  I’ve said it before and I will say it again.  Poor John McCain is still fighting the Vietnam War.  He never had closer.
  • “Media man” John McCain is suddenly against the press.  This is stupid because the press is the way to get free publicity.  Watch this if you don’t believe me.  John McCain can’t take it.  He was scheduled to appear on the Larry King show and after his campaign worker, Tucker, was asked a simple question and couldn’t answer it, John McCain said that he wouldn’t talk to Larry King. This is just like a child saying “I’m taking my toys and going home”.  Grow up, John McCain.  And you too, Sarah Palin.  If you can’t take the heat, then get the hell out of the race.  This is not about you.  This is about America and the American people.
  • The Story of Two Dogs

    Bush’s Barney isn’t considered a “health hazard” so why were these dogs considered a “health hazard”?

    Just goes to show how insensitive and heartless the commanders-in-chief have become since Bush decided to invade a sovereign nation.

    I had to wait until the tears stopped before I could post this.

    A special thanks to a brave Patriot, Casey J Porter for sharing the truth about Iraq.