The Watering Hole, Saturday, April 21, 2012: Aung San Suu Kyi

All cartoons are posted with the artists’ express permission to TPZoo.
Paul Jamiol
Jamiol’s World

Winner of the Nobel Peace Prize in 1991, Daw Aung San Suu Kyi is the leading pro-democracy opposition leader in Myanmar formerly known as Burma, one of the world’s most isolated and repressive nations.

Aung San Suu Kyi has gone from years of house arrest to becoming the elected leader of her country. However, much of her Parliament is still controlled by backers of the oppressive military. Let us hope she succeeds in freeing her people.

YOUR COMMENTS ON THIS, OR ANY OTHER SUBJECT ARE WELCOME.

Deals with the Devil

(picture via: private.addcom.de/asiaphoto)

The Myanmar junta has brought the uprising of it’s people mostly under the control of their brutal riot police, it seems. There are some demonstrations going on, but information is scarce. A dear price has been paid by scores of buddhist monks and Burmese civilians. The International community failed even to condem the regime’s brutal attacks against its citizens. “The Guardian” takes a look behind the scenes and informs us about the reasons of China’s aid to the Generals.

But it’s not only the Chines who are dealing with the devil. The French, namely the oil/energy company “Total” are busily doing business with the generals. President Sarkozy has hypocritically asked French companies to freeze new investments, fully aware of the fact, that only Total is working in Myanmar and doesn’t plan any new investments anyway.

Good Morning from Europe – The Myanmar Horror

 (Via Mala, Switzerland)

Today the news is dominated by the situation in Myanmar, more and more countries protest against the brutal crack down on the protests there, but to little avail.

Myanmar: 

There is only very little information obtainable from Burma, as the military junta has closed down all internet traffic, land and mobile phone lines are down as well. There seem to be demonstrations still. However, the monks, who were leading the uprising up to now, are mostly missing from the scene. They are allegedly held in internment camps, it may well be they simply aren’t around any more. Please do not forget to visit “The Guardian’s” blog on this and the latest developments. Showing we’re interested and that there is a large international audience, are probably the only means we have, to offer our support to the Burmese people.

Japan is reeling from the pictures of the willful shooting of Mr Nagai a video journalist. The scene was captured by another camera. (The event is very upsetting, so feel free to skip this.)

Blackwater is at least partly responsible for the surge in violence in the Fallujah region 2004, says the US House of Representatives.

After the murder of Blackwater employees in Fallujah, US troops launched an offensive, which ultimately cost the lives of 36 US soldiers, 200 Iraqi insurgents and 600 Iraqi civilians. It turns out, that Blackwater disregarded warnings about the dire security situation in Fallujah, before sending in their men. While Blackwater is rightly blamed for a variety of their actions, the blame for the disastrous planning of the war, which led to the reliance on private mercenary armies, lies elsewhere.

More details as to the shooting that triggered the Blackwater Affair have come to light as well, read more here.

Have a good day and take care everybody!

Good Morning from Europe

 

(Squirrel in Hyde Park – London)

Myanmar uprising: The Myanmar military has conducted raids on buddhist monasteries. Hundreds of monks have been arrested in an effort to curb the ongoing non violent protests. This morning, shots were fired again at protesters and riot police issued threats of more violence to participants in the demonstrations. Meanwhile, the UN Security council couldn’t find a majority to condemn the junta’s actions. China and Russia voted “Nay” to efforts to impose further sanctions on the Burmese military regime. Developments, as they unfold, can be followed here.

While some show an optimistic Al-Maliki, others rather point out the fact, that a division of Iraq in three parts is desired by the US Senate. Talk of different perspectives!

In his first meeting with President Bush, after the Blackwater Affair, Premier Maliki has discussed the affair in the context of Iraqi sovereignty issues, more specific talks on this subject will follow, when Al-Maliki meets with Condoleeza Rice.

The US led Climat Summit is not going down well with many Europeans. “Greenwashing” the climate summit is one perception of the show and some European diplomats are just as bluntly issueing their sentences. German environment minister Sigmar Gabriel is the highest ranking non US representative, however he doesn’t expect any results from the summit. So, why go there at all ?

Meanwhile, another ecological disaster is finally called thus, even by it’s own architects. China’s Three Gorges Dam, which was celebrated – despite the dire warnings of ecologists – as one of the greatest achievements in engineering and energy production, turns out to be every bit as detrimental to the environment as predicted.

Too late! The money to be made with it, has been made already!

Bushisms are not only a favourite with progressive Americans, Europeans like them, too. Or, getting explained why there weren’t any.

Europeanview wishes you all a very good day and take care!

European Newsletter – Lunch Time rerun

Myanmar. As the protesters are getting more numerous, 100’000 took to the streets yesterday, the Burmese military is starting to return the pressure. Military and riot police seem to have started to enter Rangun. The situation for the military junta is getting more precarious by the day, as the number of ordinary citizens joining the monks in their protest against the regime is rising to numbers unseen since the 1988 unrest. With the military getting more anxious to quell this uprising, the danger of violent measures by the regime is rising, too. UPDATE: UK’s Guardian has put up a blog where you can track the developments in Myanmar, as they unfold, here. In his speech before the UN general assembly President Bush has announced the US would step up sanctions as the Myanmar government continually oppressed their people for the last 19 years. For the protesters, international support and media coverage is key to their safety from a violent crack down by the junta.

Iran‘s president Ahmadinejad will also speak to the general assembly. He has received a hefty dose of democracy and free speech yesterday, when speaking at the Columbia University, so his speech at the United Nations, also later today, will be quite a relief for him – no crtitical questions from the floor are expected there.

As both, President Bush and President Ahmadinejad are speaking at the UN today, the tension between the two countries continue to be reported and commented on by European newspapers here and here, to name only two of many. And while calling for increased sanctions is the flavour of the day, business goes on as usual.

In Italy there is a heated debate going on about the new campaign by star photographer Oliviero Toscani, highlighting the devastating effects of anorexia nervosa.

And if you still have the time, read up this and rejoice, if your kids have passed the toddler age.

Good Morning from Europe – The Monks of Myanmar

Myanmar. As the protesters are getting more numerous, 100’000 took to the streets yesterday, the Burmese military is issueing threats about non-specified actions. The situation for the military junta is getting more precarious by the day, as the number of ordinary citizens joining the monks in their protest against the regime is rising to numbers unseen since the 1988 unrest. With the military getting more anxious to quell this uprising, the danger of violent measures by the regime is rising, too. US President Bush is planning to focus on the Myanmar crisis in his speech to the United Nations general assembly later today. For the protesters, international support and media coverage is key to their safety from a violent crack down by the junta.

Iran‘s president Ahmadinejad will also speak to the general assembly. He has received a hefty dose of democracy and free speech yesterday, when speaking at the Columbia University, so his speech at the United Nations, also later today, will be quite a relief for him – no crtitical questions from the floor are expected there.

As both, President Bush and President Ahmadinejad will be speaking at the UN today, the tension between the two countries continue to be reported and commented on by European newspapers here and here, to name only two of many. And while calling for increased sanctions is the flavour of the day, business goes on as usual.

In Italy there is a heated debate going on about the new campaign by star photographer Oliviero Toscani, highlighting the devastating effects of anorexia nervosa.

And if you still have the time, read up this and rejoice, if your kids have passed the toddler age.