The Watering Hole: January 10 – The Rubicon

On January 10 49 BCE, Julius Caesar crossed the Rubicon. He did this because he just had to say: “Alea iacta est.” which he thought was really clever.

This is our Open Thread. Please feel free to add your thoughts on this, or any other topic that comes to mind.

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The Watering Hole: December 30 – Land Sales

In 1626, the Manhattoes, a tribe of the Wappinger confederacy, in turn a subset of the Lenape Nation, that occupied New Jersey, Manhattan Island and the banks of Hudson River and shore of Long Island Sound, sold Manhattan to a group of immigrants. The proceeds from the sale came to 60 gilders in beads and trinkets. With inflation, that would amount to about $31,000 today.

After a number of land transfers, that land became part of The United States which has a whole new set of tribes. One member of the Democratic tribe has ceremoniously transfered that land back to members of Indian tribes who managed to survive the dynamics of history.

The Teabag tribe of the United States has raised issues on this matter. Conspiracies have been revealed that this ceremonial transfer represents a land grab precipitated by someone who has a secret relationship as a secret member of the Indian Nations. Revelations in Congress and the press cite this as only the beginning of the ceding of national territory to native tribes.

The natives are saying “A deal is a deal! You bought it, you keep it!”

Their concern is that, if they give in, they may have to take back Florida.

This is our Open Thread. Please feel free to add your thoughts on this, or any other topic that comes to mind.

And a Happy New Year to all!

The Watering Hole: December 25 – Christmas Bird Census

From December 19, 2010 until January 5, 2011; the National Audubon society is conducting a national bird census.

Here is my contribution:

Great White Egret 12/24/2010


Photo by WaltTheMan © 2010

The picture was snapped at 2:27 PM EST on December 24, 2010 at the juncture of Palmetto Road and 5th Street near Crescent Beach in Saint Johns County Florida.

This guy (or gal) was not in my feeder, but I walked (about ½ a mile) to where he (or she) was roaming. These particular birds are actually very tolerant of humans around here. If you are interested, you could nab one of these creatures for Christmas dinner. Be advised that, like bald eagles, they taste a bit fishy.

What have you observed this season?

This is our Open Thread. Please feel free to add your thoughts on this, or any other topic that comes to mind.