The Watering Hole, Tuesday December 1, 2015 – The Femisphere: Foodies and Food Politics

Profiles of food writing from a feminist perspective from MS Magazine blog.

“Without a doubt, food is an inherently feminist topic. Women are inundated on a daily basis regarding food—whether being told how to properly (and perfectly) prepare it, or how to control our intake of it for “ideal” weight purposes. While there is no shortage of both men and women who write about food online, what sets the following bloggers apart is the feminist lens they use to frame their posts. Some of these bloggers delve into the domesticity angle of food, investigating how years of stereotyped gender norms influence our relationship with food, while others focus on food politics, writing about everything from food accessibility/scarcity to ethical issues. From the delicious and delightful to the problematic and political, all of these blogger tackle food in a uniquely feminist way.”

FemFood: Profiles against the grain.

Advertisements

Sunday Roast: Cranberries!

It’s getting to be cranberry season!!  Everybody cheer!!  Or whine, if necessary.  Go ahead, we’ll wait.  *looking at watch*

I luvs me some cranberries — especially since they’re grown in Oregon.  Throw a handful of dried cranberries in my morning oatmeal, and I won’t get upset.  Hand me a refreshing glass of cranberry juice, cut 50/50 with ice-cold soda water, and I will follow you around the rest of the evening — fair warning.  How about a whole cranberry dipped in chocolate — OMG!!!!

The only cranberry thing I don’t like is that wiggly jiggly can-shaped cranberry “sauce.”  It’s too sweet, and the texture makes my tongue want to slap me, and cry “Why?  How could you do this to me!?”  Then I have to sooth it with a large slice of pumpkin pie, because I’m nice like that.

Okay, enough of my raptures.  What Fall flavors are your favorites, and what are you most looking forward to preparing/eating?  Recipes are welcome!

This is our daily open thread — Mmmmm, cranberries…

Saturday Recipe Share – September 5, 2015

Tomato season is in full swing and tomato soup is one of my favorites.  I found a good recipe which of course I had to “doctor up” to suit my taste buds.  Here it is:

Tomato Soup with Garden Fresh Tomatoes

INGREDIENTS:

2 tablespoons of olive oil (for sauteing)

4 cups of chopped fresh tomatoes

1 onion chopped

4 garlic cloves chopped (let chopped cloves sit for 15 minutes before cooking)

2 cups chicken broth

Spices:  1 tbls. Cumin, 1 1/2 teas. Turmeric, 1 1/2 teas. Ginger, 1 teas. salt, Optional: sugar to taste, fresh basil, dash of hot sauce.

Roux:

2 tablespoons butter

2 tablespoons All-purpose flour (I use King Arthur flour)

DIRECTIONS:

  1.  In a 3 quart stock pot, heat the olive oil over medium heat.  Stir in the onions and saute until softened (about 5 minutes).  Place the lid on top of the pot and only remove to stir the onions.  Remove the lid from the pot and add the cumin, turmeric and ginger and stir for about 1 to 2 minutes.  Add the garlic and stir for another minute.  Add chicken broth and tomatoes.  With the pot covered, bring to a boil and gently boil for about 20 minutes to blend all of the flavors.  Remove from heat and either run mixture through a food mill into a large bowl or pan and discard any stuff left over in the food mill OR use an emulsion blender or heavy duty blender on the mixture.  I use the Blendtec as this will fully chop the tomato skins and seeds.
  2. In shallow pan or small pot, melt the butter over medium heat.  Stir in the flour to make a roux, cooking until the roux is a medium brown.  Gradually whisk in a bit of the tomato mixture, so that no lumps form, then add the roux to the soup which should be back in the stock pot.  Stir the mixture to incorporate the roux in with the soup.  Season with salt, sugar (if needed), fresh basil, and/or hot sauce.

I give this 5 Yums.

The Watering Hole, Tuesday June 23, 2015 – Environmental News and Food Politics

“More than 90 percent of the shrimp consumed in the U.S. is imported from overseas, and yet in 2014 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) only inspected 3.7 percent of shrimp imports and tested 0.7 percent.”

Our miniscule shrimp industry feels this way about the Trans Pacific Partnership trade deal: “Members of the U.S. shrimp industry are voicing concerns that elements of a major trade deal, the Trans-Pacific Partnership, could weaken the ability of regulators to reject unsafe seafood imports.”

The rest of the story here.

The Watering Hole, Tuesday April 14, 2015 – Environmental News and Food Politics

Today environmental news  and food politics cross paths, in the UK anyway.

Warmer Waters Threaten Future of Traditional Fish and Chips

I can just see the proposals now for a pipeline connecting the Great Lakes with California after seeing this bit: Record low snowpacks in Southwest is bad news for water supplies

And the last bit of good news…

Mercury levels in Arctic birds found increasing over the past 130 years

Open thread, discuss.

The Watering Hole, Tuesday June 24, 2014 Environmental News and Food Politics

Study links pesticides and pregnancies with increased risk of autism:

“Pregnant women who lived in close proximity to fields and farms where chemical pesticides were applied experienced a two-thirds increased risk of having a child with autism spectrum disorder or other developmental delay, according to a new study.”

Another reason to go organic

New study shows link between bald eagle deaths and lead ammunition

“Endangered California condors have been the poster birds for calls to get lead ammunition out of our environment, but they might have to make some room for our nation’s most iconic raptors thanks to a new study showing how lead ammunition is also harming bald eagles.”

The NRA isn’t going to like this one.

Oppose the DARK act.

The Grocery Manufacturers Association has introduced a bill in Congress that would block states from enacting GE food labeling laws and make “voluntary labeling” the law of the land. Big Food is trying to kill your right to know if the food you’re eating is genetically engineered.

The food giants want to control the debate.